Category: Society

Review: Kerry James Marshall – Painting and Other Stuff

Is it possible to reinvent yourself completely? After all, it gets to the point when you just don’t feel like you. Pick a university in some far-off town, move house, dump your partner, move abroad… Some call it running away; some call it finding yourself. ‘Course, ‘you’ are the least of your problems: family, mates,… Read more »

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Loop Art and the Meaning of Engels

It’s only a matter of time before everything turns into bad theatre. Oh, the theme park that history becomes! All those momentous events and monumental ideologies… Walls slapped up and beaten down. Files filed and family members disappeared. Slivers of land fought and died for. Gruff men with bushy beards, whose big ideas engulfed 20, 50 years, entire lifetimes. All of… Read more »

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Estudio Nómada – Loop art route around the Barri Gòtic

Creator versus curator… aye, that old chestnut. Seriously, who wants to sleep with the guy with the great music collection to the same extent as he who composes his own minuets? And yet, when it comes to the visual arts, perhaps it’s worth reconsidering.* On Saturday afternoon I enjoyed a wee stroll through Barcelona’s Barri Gòtic, refreshingly deserted as a storm… Read more »

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What’s On? Informe per a una acadèmia – A Report to an Academy

There’s nothing quite like the shocking finale of a football match, between two teams that you do not habitually support, to leave you floundering in contradictory emotions. On the one hand, you don’t give a toss; on the other, you do – and usually for a whole bunch of irrational reasons that have nothing whatsoever to do with football. The paradoxical… Read more »

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What’s On? A casa (Kabul) by Tony Kushner, dir. Mario Gas

I’m pretty much convinced that life is a series of boxes. Boxes that we’ve made ourselves out of cardboard clichés and fantasy cement. We sit in one box – that we’ve furnished, perhaps, in the orientalist style, or done sparse and modern with white walls, plastic furniture and a hormone-boosted plant from Ikea that will never die…. Read more »

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REVIEW: Un Enemic del Poble, by Henrik Ibsen, dir. Miguel del Arco

As wikipedia tells it, so incensed was the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen at the public uproar following his new play Ghosts (a haunting account of a charitable mother whose son, a nice young man, goes bonkers having inherited syphilis from his slutty father), that he then wrote … … An Enemy of the People (1882), a… Read more »

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REVIEW: Chris Killip – Trabajo/Work – Reina Sofia, Madrid

Photographer Chris Killip, born in Douglas on the Isle of Man, spent 16 years in Newcastle upon Tyne during the 1970s and ’80s. His images of the region’s industrial workers were published in the book In Flagrante (1988) with another series Seacoal (1985) documenting the lives of the villagers of nearby Lynemouth, who made their living fishing scrap coal out of the North Sea. In… Read more »

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REVIEW: Un Trozo Invisible de Este Mundo by Juan Diego Botto

Teatre Lliure – Barcelona until September 29, 2013 The scene is set like a graveyard for dead baggage. A conveyor belt-cum-catwalk splits the stage, churning out luggage at varying speeds and quantities, some shrink-wrapped, some fancy, some battered and broken; without address tags or flight information, they seem mysteriously to vanish once they drop off… Read more »

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REVIEW: L’Onada (The Wave) dir. Marc Montserrat Drukker

Since time immemorial emotional impact has meant more than logic. More exciting, more dynamic and more persuasive than its grumbling counterpart – that harps on about niggling things, like fact and detail, profundity and practicality – it is ‘impulse’ or, euphemistically speaking, ‘intuition’ that packs the punch behind instant big decisions. Thus, we spent thousands… Read more »

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